Association > About Us > Milestones

Milestones

  • 2019

    • Co-hosted the biennial Diversity and Equity Conference in Mental Health and Addictions in Toronto, in partnership with the Society for the Study of Psychiatry and Culture from the United States.
    • Received the Advancing Minority Mental Health Award from the American Psychiatric Association.
    • The Culturally Competent Recovery College was successfully launched and delivered to three cultural (Cantonese, Mandarin, and Korean) communities.
    • Celebrated the 10th anniversary of the Journey to Promote Mental Health Training.
    • Conducted the Korean Community Mental Health Needs Assessment Study.
    • Received additional funding from the Regional Municipality of York, expanded Youth and Family Program in York Region and piloted Walk-In and Short-Term Counselling Services for youth and families.
  • 2018

    • Dr. Peter Chang, one of the founders, was appointed to the Order of Ontario.
    • Received funding from United Way to lead the Ontario Chinese Health Coalition to conduct a yearlong Vote for Health Campaign towards provincial and municipal elections.
    • The newly structured Integrated Recovery and Community Team worked with a coach through Innovweave Project to develop program impact statement and theory of change.
    • Celebrated 5th Anniversary of Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic.
    • Received funding from Bell Let’s Talk Community Fund, secured space at Dorcas Centre and launched Hong Fook Markham site for Hong Fook Youth and Family Hub.
    • Celebrated 15th Anniversary of Asian Clinic.
    • Kicked off accreditation primer application process.
    • Started to adopt Strength-based Model for Clinical staff training and supervision.
  • 2017

    • Celebrated 35th Anniversary, including hosting a Partnership Appreciation event, publishing15 client stories on Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese newspapers and compiling a client story book, rebranding the Hong Fook website.
    • Facilitated dialogues on Trauma at the Diversity and Equity in Mental Health and Addiction Conference.
    • Secured United Way Anchor Agency status.
    • Received funding from Central East LHIN to launch Community Paramedic-Led Clinic, which is an innovative model composed of community paramedics (from Toronto Paramedic Services), Mental Health & Addictions Outreach Worker (from Hong Fook) and Geriatric Mental Health Case Manager (from Cota) to deliver services to five Toronto Housing apartments identified with high 911 calls in Scarborough.
    • Received funding from the Ministry of Immigration and Citizenship to deliver Mental Health Counselling and Wellness Program for East Asian immigrants and refugees.
    • Led the translation of Ontario Perception of Care for Mental Health and Addictions, which is a mandatory evaluation tool for all health care providers funded by the Central East LHIN.
    • Conducted program revamp, restructured Prevention and Promotion Program and Self-Help Program to Integrated Recovery and Community Program. Developed resilience focused and family centred youth strategy.
    • Renewed vision, mission and value statements. Developed new strategic plan 2018-2021.
  • 2016

    • Received funding from the Regional Municipality of York to pilot the Wrap Around Teen Mental Health Project for Grade 9-Grade 12 students residing in York Region and their parents.
    • In partnership with the Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants (OCASI) and the Canadian Centre for Victim of Tortures (CCVT), launched two-day Mental Health and Trauma training program for the settlement sector in the Province of Ontario to respond to the influx of Syrian Refugees.
    • Established the Pediatric Clinic at the Chester Le Junior Public School in Scarborough.
  • 2015

    • Conducted an organizational review (1) to streamline Central Intake: responding to inquiries about programs and services; providing seamless access for prospective clients; and providing links to external programs; (2) to invest in new technologies; (3) to change the organizational structure to improve clinical integration.
    • In partnership with Scarborough Hospitals, Rouge Valley Hospital, Lakeridge Health and Durham Mental Health Services, piloted the Hospital to Home project to provide short-term case management: providing brief and intermittent services, assisting with immediate concerns that may not require ongoing support.
    • Completed Community Mental Health Needs Assessment Studies in two language communities: Mandarin and Vietnamese.
    • The Asian Clinic was expanded to Scarborough at the Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic.
  • 2014

    • In partnership with 3 Universities (OCAD, U of T and Ryerson U), conducted mental health groups and workshops for the students in particular to the new immigrants, visa students; diversity and cultural competency training for the international student advisors, counsellors and health care providers.
    • Participated in the Scarborough North and South Health Links to increase care coordination among health care providers for the most vulnerable clients with complex health care needs.
    • Began to provide Mental Health First Aid Training for the Chinese and Korean Communities.
  • 2013

    • Grand Opening of the HF Connecting Health Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic at 3280 Midland Avenue, Scarborough to serve the entire Scarborough North Community to provide primary care services up to 3,200 unattached clients with a focus on immigrant health and mental health.
    • In partnership with Toronto Western Hospital Asian in Mental Health (AIM) and Abrigo Centre to conduct Journey to Healing Psychoeducational groups and Integrated Behavioral Group Therapy Sessions (Toronto Central LHIN Funding) for the Chinese and Portuguese Communities both at Downtown and North York.
    • In partnership with Lakeridge Health (now change to partner with Taibu Community Health Centre) and Malvern Family Resource Centre to deliver Choices Youth Program for the at risk youth (Central East LHIN Funding).
    • In partnership with East Metro Youth Services to deliver Chinese Youth Outreach Worker (YOW) program in the entire East quadrant of Toronto.
    • As a key partner for the National Research Project: Strength in Unity- Asian Male Mental Health Needs Study (3 years)- University of Toronto, University of Ryerson.
  • 2012

    • Celebrated 30th Anniversary.
    • Moved the Downtown office to 130 Dundas Street West, Toronto in mid March.
    • Received funding from TD Bank to pilot the “Blossom of Hope” Social Enterprises Project for self-help clients.
  • 2011

    • Opened the North York branch at 1751 Sheppard Avenue East, North York.
    • Received funding from Ontario Trillium Foundation Capital Grant for the renovations of the North York New Branch and the Scarborough Head Office.
    • Received funding from the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration Partnership Grant for the “Ignite Leadership for Immigrants’ Health” which brought volunteers together from diverse ethnic backgrounds through leadership trainings in five languages.
    • Received funding from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care to set up the Nurse  Practitioner-Led Clinic, which became a new model for building the ethno-cultural mental health services into a primary health care setting. The NPLC Team brings together nurses, social worker, dietitian, health promoter and consulting physicians in one setting to provide health care for the community, including seeing clients who do not have a family doctor.
  • 2010

    • Received funding from Canada Post Mental Health Foundation for the “Wellness Recovery Action Plan” training for staff, clients, consumers and family members.
  • 2009

    • Moved the uptown head office to 3320 Midland Avenue, Scarborough.
  • 2008

    • Received funding from Citizenship and Immigration Canada for the “Journey to Promote Mental Health” training series for settlement agencies across the province of Ontario.
  • 2007

    • Celebrated 25th Anniversary.
    • Organized 1st Annual Walk for Wellness.
    • Hosted 1st Diversity and Equity in Mental Health & Addiction Conference.
  • 2003

    • The Asian Community Psychiatric Clinic was established at the downtown location.
  • 2001

    • Began to offer Supportive Housing service with 16 apartment units.
    • Hong Fook Mental Health Foundation was established.
    • Received funding from the Ontario Women’s Health Council for a research project through which the Peer Leadership Training model was developed for the Prevention and Promotion Program.
  • 2000

    • Partnered with Mt. Sinai Hospital to form an ethno-cultural Assertive Community Treatment Team.
  • 1997

    • Began serving the Korean community.
  • 1995

    • Opened the uptown head office at 1065 McNicoll Avenue, Scarborough.
  • 1994

    • Became a member of United Way of Toronto.
  • 1991

    • Obtained the charitable status; held the 1st fundraising banquet.
  • 1988

    • Moved to 146 Augusta Avenue, Toronto.
    • Started having social recreational program for clients.
    • Started having family support group.
  • 1986

    • Two part-time community education workers were hired to do mental health promotion.
    • Started serving the Cambodian community.
    • Started having ESL class for clients in collaboration with Toronto District School Board.
  • 1984

    • Moved to 41 Cecil Street, Toronto.
  • 1982

    • Hong Fook Mental Health Association was incorporated.
    • Opened its first office in the Cecil Community Centre serving the Chinese and Southeast Asian communities.
  • 1981

    • Broadened the mandate to serve Cambodian, Lao, Vietnamese refugee population as per funders’ request.
    • Funding was secured after several rounds of proposal submission.
  • 1980

    • The funding proposal with a consultation liaison service delivery model was submitted to the Ministry of Health.
    • The Agency Name of Hong Fook Mental Health Association was adopted.
  • 1979

    • The group developed a volunteer service delivery model and started to provide phone-in hotline for community agencies/hospitals for consultation and possible interpretation services in partnership with University Settlement House.
  • 1976 to 1978

    • An informal network, later named Chinese Community Service Workers Group, was set up to discuss how to improve mental health services and to promote better mental health within the Chinese community.